An article last month discussed how centerline and edge line markings on our highways make driving easier and safer. That article explained the requirements that mandated pavement markings, where they were optional, and where they were not recommended without a compelling engineering reason …

Pedestrian safety is a two-way street – drivers must be aware of pedestrians and what they might do, and pedestrians must be aware of drivers and what they might do.

As I write this article, it looks like students will be physically returning to our schools sometime during September, with some schools beginning as early as the eighth while others not until the 21st. Since schools were closed because of COVID 19 and education was continued virtually with …

Driver mistakes play a role in virtually all crashes. That’s why automation has been held up as a potential game changer for safety. But autonomous vehicles might prevent only around a third of all crashes if automated systems drive too much like people, according to a new study from the Ins…

When spring comes, we can’t wait until the New York State Department of Transportation repaints the lines in the road. It makes driving so much easier. Pavement markings are used to guide and regulate traffic. They can improve the safety of a highway and inform the driver without diverting a…

Every day as I drive in the village of Malone, where there are several miles of four-lane streets and roads, I cannot drive more than a couple of blocks without watching at least one driver change lanes without using his/her turn signal. And, the number of drivers that fail to use their turn…

For those of you that are regular readers of these weekly articles on vehicle and traffic law and traffic safety, you know that my position, like many others in traffic safety, is not to use the word “accident” when referring to traffic crashes. Indeed, they are crashes or collisions, not ac…