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If you are a regular reader of these weekly articles on traffic law and traffic safety, you know my position on backing crashes — we back our vehicles about 1/10 of one percent of the time yet backing crashes exceed 10 percent of all crashes. In other words, we drivers are not very good at b…

If you read these weekly articles, even occasionally, you will often find information from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the agency that crash-tests vehicles just to see just how safe they are. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety assigns one of several safety ratings, so…

In August 2020, the CTIA, a representative of America’s wireless industry, reported that there were 442.5 million U.S. wireless subscriptions, up 20+ million year-over-year. The CTIA further reported that in 2019 consumers exchanged 2.1 trillion text messages, up 52 billion from the prior ye…

Crash rates for drivers in their 70s (that includes me) are now less likely to be involved in a fatal crash than those in their prime working years, a new Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) study has found. That’s a remarkable reversal for a generation of drivers once thought to b…

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If you are a reader of these weekly articles on traffic law and traffic safety, you are aware that I never write about traffic accidents – I always refer to them as crashes or collisions. In fact, I have written full articles, the most recent one in May, 2019, trying to get people and news m…

Last week’s article presented 20 questions on vehicle and traffic law (VTL) and traffic safety. Hopefully you took the test and kept your answers handy. This article repeats the questions and includes the answers. See how you did.

A recent article (Jan. 1 by Christina Goldbaum) in the New York Times spoke to a deadly consequence of the pandemic — a significant increase in traffic deaths. When the pandemic hit New York City, cars seemed to disappear from many streets as the lockdown brought urban life to a halt and dri…

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In early December, I proposed in my weekly article on vehicle and traffic law (VTL) and traffic safety that we should consider standardizing vehicle and traffic laws nationwide. In that article, I described numerous traffic laws that differed from state to state, and asked how drivers could …

Have you ever borrowed someone else’s car? Have you lent your car to someone else? If so, are you aware of potential requirements and potential consequences? I had someone recently ask me who is responsible for the ticket if someone driving a borrowed car is ticketed for an expired inspectio…

Alcohol has been a factor in 30 percent of U.S. roadway deaths every year for the past decade. Meanwhile, police arrest about 1 million people a year for alcohol-impaired driving. Systems that can detect the percentage of alcohol in the driver’s blood and prevent the vehicle from moving if i…

It was nip and tuck, but in the end, Santa has decided that a virtual Christmas just wasn’t good enough, so, after contacting the best health experts he could and presenting his plan to deliver Christmas gifts around the world in spite of COVID-19, his plans have been approved and he has mad…

In late October and early November, two of these weekly articles explained the difficult decisions that were necessary for our various highway departments to deal with snow and ice control on our highways, and some of the factors that lead to using abrasives or salt. Complicating this dilemm…

MALONE — Passing a stopped school bus with red lights flashing is against the law in New York state, as it is in all states. We know this, but are you aware of the differences in other states? For instance, it’s illegal to pass a stopped school bus even if it is stopped on the other side of …

If you’re a poker player, being predictable is the worst thing you can be. But, if you drive a vehicle, being predictable is probably the best thing you can be. If you could communicate to drivers around you exactly what you intended to do, it would make life so much easier for other drivers…

We have many Amish and Mennonite families in Franklin and St. Lawrence counties. Amish buggies have been granted an exception to the requirement to display a Slow Moving Vehicle symbol on the rear of their buggies and wagons for religious reasons.

Last week’s article discussed some of the things to consider when deciding whether to use salt on roads or abrasives, such as sand, for snow and ice control. Most people would guess that using abrasives is far cheaper than using salt. Maybe not! Here is some information that most citizens ar…

There has been much discussion on whether to use sand and other abrasives or salt to treat slippery roads during winter. This is not an easy decision to make. There are pluses and minuses for both. More recently, there is significant opposition to salt, but sand and abrasives also have a neg…

As winter approaches and if you are among the many residents in Franklin County with a rural mailbox along the side of the road, pay attention to the rest of this article, as fixing your box in the middle of the winter is not much fun.

Like it or not, winter driving is about to hit us, and so is the usual increase in crashes as we all but refuse to drive more slowly and carefully, or leave in time to get there without driving faster than we should. And, every year we read or hear about safe driving tips in the media, and y…