According to Mary Scharf, president of the Malone Revitalization Foundation, a total of 323 homes and buildings can be a part of a potential second historic district in the village, after a representative from the state’s board of preservation visited Malone in mid-March. Alexander Violo/Malone Telegram

MALONE — A total of 323 homes and buildings can be a part of a potential historic district in Malone as the Malone Chamber of Commerce and the Malone Revitalization Foundation work to bring a second historic district to the village.

According to Mary Scharf, president of the Malone Revitalization Foundation, a representative from the state’s board of preservation visited Malone on March 16, in order to determine what buildings and residences can be included in this second district.

Scharf emphasized a historic designation does not restrict what property owners can do with their property.

“There are no restrictions to landowners, only benefits,” Scharf said, “I think there is a misconception out there that people will be told what to do. There are no restrictions on what they can do it’s a benefit to the village.”

The historic district includes homes and buildings between Clay and Pearl Street on one side of Route 11 and from Elm to Third Street on the other side of the state highway, according to Scharf.

Scharf said the initial goal was to have about 150 homes incorporated in the second historic district, but was thrilled more were included after the March visit by Daniel Bagrow from the state’s office of parks, recreation and historic preservation.

“When he (Bagrow) saw it in person I think it really showed how many historic properties we have here, something you can’t get by looking at it on Google,” Scharf said.

Scharf said the next step in the historic designation process is getting the funding together to pay for a survey that is required to be completed before an application goes before the state for potential approval.

The state’s board of preservation holds a public hearing and a state committee votes on a historic district’s application before it receives a state listing, according to Scharf, who said last year’s vote was held in December 2020.

Scharf described the listing as extraordinarily valuable, explaining property owners in a historic district can take advantage of tax credit programs to assist with repairs, including work on roofs, furnaces, kitchens and baths.

According to Scharf, property owners in a listed historic district who perform renovations can receive a 20% tax credit from both the federal government and New York State, for a total of 40% tax credit, adding property owners who make less than $60,000 annually can receive these savings directly in lieu of a tax credit.

Malone’s fire historic district, its commercial core, was designated as a historic district by the New York State Board of Preservation in December 2020, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Architecture in March.

The village’s second historic district would focus on historic homes and building in the village, according to Scharf.

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