SARANAC LAKE — Bidding is open on a tiny house built by students in the Building Trades program at Adirondack Educational Center in Saranac Lake.

Franklin-Essex-Hamilton BOCES built the tiny house over the last two years, according to an email from Jess Collier, BOCES’ public information specialist, which states bidding on the 280-square foot tiny house will close at 6 p.m., Tuesday, May 18.

The tiny house is not the only home built by local students to recently go on the market, according to Collier, who said FEH BOCES also runs a school in Malone, North Franklin Educational Center.

A modular home built by students in Malone this year, sold in April, through a sealed bid process, which yielded two bids, the highest of which totaled approximately $98,000, according to Collier’s email.

Collier said the student-built modular home was purchased by Titus Real Estate.

“We had a little over $55,000 in materials into the building,” Collier said in an email, “We always hope to at least cover what we put into it.”

Collier’s email stated the money made from the sale of the modular home will go back to the Building Trades program. “All the money made from the sale goes right back into the program and more materials for next year’s building,” Collier’s email said.

Collier said the plan is to build another modular home in Malone next year.

“The teacher, Eric Ashlaw, feels that it gives the students an authentic learning experience similar to what he’s done when he was working in the field,” Collier said, in an email.

60 BOCES students worked on the modular home in Malone this year, the first time the school worked on a project of this size in about 20 years.

The students’ modular home is a three-bedroom structure, with two full bathrooms, and a kitchen space.

The Building Trades program, in Saranac Lake, a two-year program whose students constructed the tiny house currently for sale, serves students in Lake Placid, Long Lake, Saranac Lake, and Tupper Lake.

The design of the house built by students in the program changes every year so students in the two-year program get to learn about different building types, strategies and considerations, according to Collier’s email, which said students usually build one a year but the building of this tiny house was delayed by COVID-19.

Students start from scratch, designing and building the tiny house from the bottom up on a specially made trailer, learning carpentry, electrical work, plumbing, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning work as they complete their project.

This year’s tiny house was built in the style of a barn, with red vinyl siding, a metal roof, and an eight-by-seven foot deck that folds out when the owner parks, according to Collier’s email, which said the tiny house has a full bathroom, an open loft to use as a bedroom, a common area with a kitchen, and a sun room.

The tiny house includes Wi-Fi switches that connect to an app, which lets the owner turn lights and other electronics on and off through their phone, according to Collier’s email.

Bid packages for potential buyers interested in the Saranac Lake-built tiny house are available on Auctions International at bit.ly/FEHBTinyHouse21.

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Johnson Newspapers 7.1

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